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Tunesday: The Minutemen, Corona

If you kids ever wonder why we olden shits scoff at your Beeber and all that empty Disney crap, it’s because the music we played to make the double-hung windows shake was unimaginably awesome. You know nothing about the 1980s–Patti Labell and Duran Duran?  I never once saw a girl wearing leg warmers on the street. Screw that.

Yes, I am that old guy shaking his fist at you and telling you to get out of my yard, but the Minutemen were the coolest band ever.  Ever.

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(Spooky) Tunesday–Girl In A Coma

Tunesday is back, on a Wednesday of course, with a Halloween theme:  Girl In A Coma, “Cemetery Baby.”  This band is so damned fantastic, you owe it to yourself to listen….

Ladies, please come to Pittsburgh!

 

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Tunesday: X, True Love

Damn.  Never saw this before, and it’s awesome–though something tells me the band didn’t take making videos too seriously.

And a bonus because I love you:

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Tunesday: Social Distortion

So this is one of those songs for driving, when the light turns green and throttle goes down, surging down the on ramp, windows open, the road open ahead.

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Tunesday: 1988 Throwing Muses–Juno, Bright Yellow Gun & More

614Y9SNK81LKristen Hersh and her band, Throwing Muses, have been among my very favorites since I initially heard the song “Juno” from their first full length album, House Tornado, grind it’s way out of my stereo speakers back in 1988.  I’ve begun to realize what a magnificent year that was for my musical tastes–maybe there was something special in the air, maybe something in me, but I discovered a phenomenal number of artists that year that still hear regular play at my house, and for the next several Tunesdays I’ll be sharing some of them with you.

That album, House Tornado, was utterly vital and fantastic, and Hersh’s deeply personal writing struck a note with my poetry-addicted mind.  And doesn’t she look cool in her modest skirt, cardigan, and bad-ass rock and roll guitar pose?  Of note: I bought House Tornado on vinyl a few weeks after its release, then bought it again as one of the first three CDs I ever bought (the same day I bought my first CD player–I was a late and reluctant adopter) because, at the time, it was my favorite album.

Juno (1988) Not the best quality video, but….

kristin h trim

Bright Yellow Gun (1995) Doesn’t this one want you to break traffic laws?

Not Too Soon (1991)

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Tunesday: Violent Femmes–Gone Daddy Gone

I was in tenth grade. Xylophone solo?  Hell, yes.  This song is even better now than it was 30 years ago.  I used to listen to these guys for hours.

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Tunesday: Kickball Katy Goodman

And in the “Why we really love hipsters even though they’re so easy to make fun of” column….

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Sleater-Kinney

What are you doing on this cold winter’s night?  I’ll be making sure my ears ring in the morning.

http://www.post-gazette.com/ae/music/2015/02/26/Long-gone-grrrls-Reunited-Sleater-Kinney-returns-to-Pittsburgh-after-19-years-away-on-No-Cities-to-Love-tour/stories/201502260022

 

 

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Sheena…

What else could follow my last post?

Sheena

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Friday Rock and Roll Heroes: Lone Justice

Lone Justice. If you don’t recognized the name of the band, you’re not alone–they burned bright and brilliant for a few short years in the mid-1980s, an edgy country-blues-pop band that defied the classifications of the time, too hard edged and rock and roll for Nashville, too country for pop, and eventually too commercially viable for the “cowpunk” scene they slotted into.  They were a big presence on indie and college radio at a time where the number of successful bands who leaned towards traditional could fit, albeit uncomfortably, in the round corner booth at Denny’s.  The Beat Farmers and come to mind,  and giants like the inimitable band “X,” and maybe The Meat Puppets–but I’d most closely associate them with another great little band called The Blasters, in that their country roots showed a little darker than most, and even then Lone Justice had some strong southern blues undercurrents that placed them left of center of one of the more unwieldy sub-genres of music.

I got the first Lone Justice album from the RCA Record club–the greatest thing ever.  It seems silly now in the midst of almost universal digital access, but music used to be expensive, and kids in small towns like mine were at the mercy of our record sellers.  Now, we had a good, non-corporate record store, but they leaned more towards bands like Yes and Edgar Winter and sold a lot of bongs.  Rowdy kids jamming old-fashioned country revved up with alternative vigor weren’t on their radar.  RCA ran advertisements in newspapers and magazines along with their glossier rival, Columbia House, which was bigger and fancier but required a much larger commitment–get 12 records for free, a 13th for $3.99, and agree to buy 5 or 6 more at “regular club” prices, which were on the high side, and the old “shipping and handling” scam.  RCA only gave you 6 free, but you just had to buy one at a discount and two more at those club prices..  You could be out of there with nine records for $30, wait a couple months, and sign up again–and RCA had a small but interesting selection of “interesting” recording.

I didn’t know much about Lone Justice expect that the sounded great, but when the album arrived and I threw it on the turntable, it was like BAM–my tastes in music changed.  Not completely, but more than a little. I’d already had my alternative tastes challenged by a friend who kept giving me Grateful Dead tapes, and turning me on to all the country-blues-roots that come with the Dead, but Lone Justice sent me deep into the barnyard.  A few years later I would buy the Cowboy Junkies “Trinity Sessions,” and that band would instantly become–and it still remains–my absolute favorite, while my musical tastes are best described as “confused.’