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Baltimore: Really, Who Didn’t See This Coming?

cop 1I feel bad for Baltimore, just as I felt bad for Ferguson–because of the innocents who get caught up in the mayhem, because of setbacks the violence and thievery of a few selfish punks who inevitably appear to take advantage of the frustration, grief, and despair which always lay behind these incidents. I feel bad for the victims, not just from today but from the harsh, inevitable retribution that will storm down upon citizens of the affected communities long after our short collective attention spans have moved on to the next big thing.

I’ve heard it asked over and over again, “how can those people do this?” Those people.

I’ve heard words like “thugs’ and “savages”–the same words we use to describe our foreign enemies, words spoken in true ignorance, but with all due respect to the innocent, we reap what we sow.  But then, who didn’t see this coming? Young people, especially young black men, have been dying at the hands of police officers in almost plague-like numbers.  Worse still, these incidents have not abated one bit despite growing community concern and unprecedented media attention–a indicator of just  t how arrogant the offenders are, and just how little they worry about punishment.

dangerousConsider the young man in San Bernardino County, California who ran from Sheriff’s deputies looking to arrest him on identity theft charges. He ran for it, in a T.J, Hooker-worthy chase  that ultimately included automobiles, motorcycles, helicopters, running through the desert and stolen horses. Ignore for a moment the wisdom of investing so much time, energy, resources, effort and, most of all, ego into chasing a suspect of a non-violent crime, and move to the finish where, having been tasered off a stolen horse, the really, really pissed off cops–eleven of them–kicked the crap out of this guy, who had surrendered, face down in the dirt, hands behind his back.  It was so crowded around his body that the cops had to take turns getting their kicks in.  Did I mention that all this happened with a new helicopter hovering overhead?  That’s what I mean by arrogance–and zero fear of justice. And this was a white guy!  Imagine if it had been a young black kid?  I have this vision of them burying the body right there in amidst the brush, taking selfies and waving to the copter while they took turns digging his shallow grave.

And yet, most people are good people, although we’ve allowed things to get this far. All of us.  Most leaders are conscientious leaders, but they have settled for plugging the holes in our breached social dam with mud and tree stumps. despite the rain. Heck, most cops are good cops–I have friends and relatives are among them–but too many have made the easy choice and put brotherhood over honest service. I know many officers lose sleep over that choice, but it is silence that takes us this place where a man is taken into custody because of a suspicion–there was no observed or alleged crime, no outstanding warrant–and ended up dead. He was pursued and apprehended because he ran. That is all.  If he ran because he was afraid it seems that he was right to feel that way–let’s be forthright here: as inflammatory as it sounds, it is a short step to equate what law enforcement has been doing to black folks to the tacitly approved lynchings in the southern USA only a generation ago

Now, I’ve already seen conservatives arguing that this guy was a recidivist not worthy of the destruction being wrought in his name, but here’s the thing: it’s not so much about Pepper Gray: it’s about the last guy, and the guy before that, and the guy before that. Black folks have a particular right to be both terrified and outraged, pushed into a metaphorical corner by a seemingly relentless pattern of authoritarian violence, the only possible end to which had to be rebellion; but this extends beyond race.

help-policePolicing has become synonymous with dominant aggression.  Officers are trained to assume a posture of outrageous aggression as a preemption to resistance or, in layman’s terms, that cop who gets in your face and shouts and curses at you is doing it purposefully, to establish his dominance and control your interaction.  Trained to approach all interactions from an aggressive posture, it is little wonder so many encounters quickly go bad. It is only a few steps up the escalation ladder from there.

The problem is that the good cops, as I said earlier, put brotherhood ahead of justice.  I understand this. They must feel it is an obligation, literally putting their lives in each others hands sometimes, to circle the wagons when one of them screws up.  By the same logic, our prosecutors who rely on and work with theses officers on an daily basis feel that obligation.  And the juries, faced with an allegedly abusive cop, the evidence against whom has been white-washed by a protective establishment, is forced to decide between an allegedly bad cop and the allegedly deserving “criminal,” with whom are they going to identify? I’d make examples here, but the victims are too many to count.  Pick the homeless guy on the BART platform in San Francisco a few years back, or the little kid with a toy gun in Cleveland, or the dude selling loose smokes in New York.  Or the kid with Downs syndrome who was killed barehanded because he had a tantrum about leaving a movie theater.  Or a hundred others–there are hundreds of cases all a click away, if one chooses to look, of cops who lose it and never, ever face justice.

Unfortunately, when one officer is shielded from justice, then another, and another, and another–while their victims are killed in what seems like an almost methodical attempt at putting the disenfranchised in their places, tension tends to build.  A person who watched the TV news sees and endless parade of mostly black suspects–not convicts, but suspects–perp-walked across the TV screen every night, with not a word mentioned when many of these suspects are later released.  Similarly, law enforcement blithely posts booking photos of suspects on their web sites, but never offers explanations when many of those people are released.

But when a police officer kills a citizen, we face the great blue wall of silence, with no orange jumpsuits or perp-walks, no parading before the public.  Some variation of “Police officials declined to reveal the names of the officers involved, or comment beyond saying that there would be an internal investigation.  The officers have been put on administrative leave with pay.”

7b3298070c7aec58d144ae6027ddc52fThat’s not right, but we tolerate it.  Until we resist, and demand sweeping reform of law enforcement, we are all complicit in both the rioting and the murders that preceded them.  Communities must rise up and demand accountability, and honest police officers must abandon the “thin blue line” mentality and regard transgressors as soldiers regard traitors whose behavior endangers both their mission and their lives.  If we don’t, the prospect of expanded, open rebellion and the violence that accompanies both it and the inevitable government response is inevitable

 

 

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D.A.H.O.F. Enshrines Kevin Sorbo

<> at Grimaldi Forum on June 9, 2011 in Monaco, Monaco.Hercules was half god.  Kevin Sorbo, the actor who famously played him for years on syndicated television, is not half god–he’s half mortal.  The rest is all dumb ass, and in recognition for this he is the latest candidate to earn a place in the storied Dumb Ass Hall of Fame.

A vocal self-proclaimed conservative, Sorbo is a regular contributor to right-leaning internet publications, but has never been known for the sort of breathless anger and disregard for fact that characterizes most opportunistic wingnut commentators.  He passed as rational, if somewhat misguided, until recently.

In response to the riots which followed the killing of unarmed teenager Michael Brown by a police officer, and the subsequent efforts by police and local government to distract and evade demands for accountability, Sorbo fell into a very typically racist rebuttal, describing the protestors as something less than human, and less worthy of justice:

“Ferguson riots have very little to do with the shooting of the young man. It is an excuse to be the losers these animals truly are. It is a tipping point to frustration built up over years of not trying, but blaming everyone else, The Man, for their failures. It’s always someone else’s fault when you give up.”

Losers. And animals.

Then he blames the press. ”Want the riots to end in Ferguson? Ban the media who are nothing more than agitators promoting the circus environment and inciting outsiders to join in the frenzy” 

When the story quickly went viral, Sorbo cowardly pulled his comments from his facebook page and offered up a half-assed mea culpa that wasn’t so much an apology, but a ‘what I meant to say was….” clarification in which he still managed to be an dumb ass.

“Okay….I stand humiliated and humbled. My most sincere apologies for my post on the events in Ferguson. I posted out of frustration and anger over the violence and looting. My words were never meant to hurt the African-American community. My use of the word “losers’ was directed at those doing the looting and vandalising and violence toward others. Anyone who does that is a loser in my book. So I will not apologise to those who are looting stores and vandalising there own community. I am very sorry for the police shooting. To answer violence with violence is not the answer here. Real leaders need to emerge out of that community to deal with the problems with the excessive use of police force. I agree with you that the police action has only added to the reaction of the residents of Ferguson. Yes. I am an idiot and do hold myself accountable for the way my post came off.”

Too late, Kevin. Apologies made while in disaster control mode don’t count.

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June 5, 1989 Tian An Men

In 1989 I was a college student, largely self-absorbed and still working on figuring out how the world fit together, and disengaged from the idea that I fit in that picture as well.  There was no internet.  I didn’t have a newspaper subscription, and I watched very little television.  So it was that the Tiananmen Square Protest of that year were little more than background static–blurbs heard in passing on the radio, bits of conversation overheard here and there, headlines on magazines in the grocery store check-out line.  Had I been paying attention, I would undoubtedly have been transfixed by the student protests–I vaguely remember thinking how shocking it was.  China seemed monolithic and steady.  When the government declared martial law and violently suppressed the students, I nodded: this was China, this is how things are in China.  It was only a matter of time.

And then, in the midst of the tragic, murderous crackdown, something amazing happened.  A man, probably a man of great love and conviction, said “enough” and, without stopping to set down his bag, stepped in front of a squadron of tanks.  He stepped into the street and there’s no question his eyes made contact with the eyes of the young men driving and commanding that tank–and just maybe those soldiers had seen enough because together, the unknown man of conscience and the un-named soldiers, changed the world.

A few months later, and halfway around the world, the Berlin Wall fell, and everything we’d ever known about fear and distrust, friendship and animosity, changed with it, just as everything we knew about China changed.

tiananmen_3_

 

Tank-Man-By-Jeff-Widener

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tank_man

…there is no price tag on courage… Tiananmen Square remembered…#TBSU…