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On United Airlines, Customer-Beating, and One Particularly Self-Righteous Pilot’s Wife

Update: I wrote this a while ago, when the first flurry of outrage was still rippling across the electronic netherworld, but never really liked where it ended up, so it was abandoned to the “drafts” bin. Might as well spend it now–it’s not going to get any more relevant than it already isn’t. Or perhaps not. Shockingly, in the intervening weeks we’ve seen incident after incident on major airlines and their affiliates of Airline Employees Gone Bad. I don’t know if these people are so arrogant that they don’t care, or so put-upon that they just crack, but the continued parade of abuse, and the total lack of self-awareness that goes with it, is mind blowing. Do the perpetrators not see the bobbing cell phones recording every minute from the very moment voices are raised, or do they just not care? The same thing goes for police officers caught on film–increasingly on their own and their partners’ body cameras–abusing and occasionally killing citizens. I just don’t get it.

So, what drags Junk Chuck out of his novel hole and back to the blog? Why, it is you, Dear Reader. It has always been you. You and, this time, United Airlines, the Chicago Airport Police (not real police, but they’ve got dreams), and their apologists, especially one particularly self-righteous, alleged wife-of-a-pilot who wasted few words (seriously, she used a lot of them) in lecturing you, me, and the rest of the poor, unwashed masses on why United was right–and, gods-damned it–entitled to beat a stubborn geriatric no-goodnik passenger senseless for daring–daring, I say–to question the corporate sovereignty of the friendly skies.

Don’t you love a good rant? All those italics and breathless syntax! Exhilarating.

So, by now I expect anyone taking the time to read this knows the story. United fills up all the seats on a plane, decides it needs to deadhead a crew to the destination airport, and sends a lackey onto the plane to first beg, then bribe, then threaten with force and ultimately beat senseless and drag an already seated, fully-paid customer off the plane. Google it. Pick your source. The situation is such a mess, so poorly handled, so egregiously arrogant and disrespectful, that a reasonable person couldn’t possibly imagine it happening in real life. And yet….

It happened. And the internet exploded. In a way, this was a fascinating experience for me–I hadn’t slept well, and was up very very early, just as the story was beginning to spread on Twitter, on my news aggregator, on Facebook. I got to see the numbers surge from trickle to flood, deriving a grim, unwholesome satisfaction from watching the shared outrage grow. As the moments passed, I thought what I always think when video of heavy-handed authorities skull-cracking and jack-booting: it is 2017, everyone has a phone, and every phone has a camera–how do you think this is going to turn out?

The answer is that these people don’t stop to think. It never occurs to them. Drunk with power, heavy with authority, outraged by the mere hint of resistance or disrespect, they do not question their right to assert themselves. What really struck me in this situation at United was the utter coolness of the perpetrators–this was no jowly redneck spitting and cursing at a motorist who gave him what feels like “attitude.” This was calmly considered violence, ruthlessly and coldly delivered as the cameras rolled and the other passengers shouted in protest. The guys with badges did what they did because they have been conditioned to feel that it is their privilege and responsibility to do so. I believe the other customers were fortunate that none of the many who spoke out were not punched in the face for their concern.

I thought about posting when this happened, but resisted until the Pilot’s Wife blog drew my attention. At first I pumped out a paragraph on a friend’s Facebook page, after she posted a link, but my friends don’t deserve that, and who reads any long comments on Facebook, anyway?  And like that, here we are. I’ve attached the entire post below, just in case “Angela” gets religion and deletes her post–she’s already closed comments, and as cowardly as that is, after reading a few I can see why. She’s not really getting the love.

So I guess, in Angela’s universe, that everyone had it wrong and the guy with the busted nose, broken teeth, and concussion should apologize for inconveniencing United, it’s employees, the tone-deaf management that continued to deny responsibility and victim-blame long after anyone (except Angela, it seems) remained on their side. He scared people with his getting beaten. He created a security crisis by getting knocked unconscious. In fact, I’m pretty sure that his passive resistance endangered the entire concept of inalienable rights, life, liberty, the pursuit of happiness and the while causing the very foundation of western society to tremble. The earth shook when he said no, and god Itself hiccupped. Or was that a burp?

Of course the guy could have been more graceful, but human beings get tired and frustrated, and sometimes they shout out in horror and pain when taking their licks. And occasionally, they take umbrage to getting trod upon, especially by “the man.”  I know that stubborn feeling and I expect you do too: face heating to a full flush, throat constricting, tunnel vision, helplessness in conflict–whether through true vulnerability by by the sheer frustration of holding to societal norms in the face of unreasonable aggression. For me, it is often the latter, the necessity of restraint, of not punching the source of the insult, or petty tyranny, square in the face. The older I get, the more I want to fight. To resist. When people are dehumanized, this is what happens–United treated this person as cargo, nothing more, and while a lot of the blame probably goes on the airline gate staff whom I expect are tired with always being stuck dealing with this sort of thing, the “we pulled names out of a hat and you lost” approach, after they’d seated the plane and folks had stowed their carry-ons, just begged for trouble.

Making seated customers get off the plane? It is outrageous. Imagine standing in line at a movie theater, buying your popcorn, and settling into your seat only to have an usher approach and say, “We need to have seats for some of our employees to watch this movie, and we’ve chosen you to leave. So, get out.” I know what I would have said, if I’d been that doctor, a verb followed by the word “you.” Or “off,” I’m not particular.

I sympathize with the customer one hundred percent. United lost this argument the moment this wasn’t dealt with at the gate–the only option beyond that was to shovel money at customers until someone snatched it. As for the writer of article, and the doe-eyed cows who complain that the victim should have given in and meekly surrendered his seat: His bought and paid for that seat. That he was sitting in.

What have we become, that the civilized response to arbitrary expressions of corporate or government power is meek capitulation? I am shamed by the Americans who condemned this man, but energized by the chorus of voices, including many of those people on the plane who spoke up at the time and whose outrage was essential in getting this story told.

We live in a nation where corporations have equal and, in many cases, greater rights and and privileges than citizens and the communities in which we live. Just miles from where I live, two small communities are being sued by a large petroleum corporation and also by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection after passing a local law that bans the dangerous practice of injecting chemical-laden waste into abandoned natural gas wells. At risk is the groundwater for the entire region. The corporation has won the latest round of litigation, as it has determined that corporations have the right to do things and the people–We The People–have “no legal standing” to resist.

Think that through for a moment. A company can get a permit at the state or federal level to endanger your drinking water, and neither you nor your legally elected officials have the right to say no. There is only the State and The Corporation. Humans don’t exist. You don’t exist. Adding insult to injury is the so-called DEP, which is suing these tiny rural communities for daring to make their own local rules. They protect nothing but corporate rights

If it seems like a stretch to compare the two situations, consider the underlying principle: individuals assaulted–whether by fist or injection well–and then suppressed for resisting. There is a long line of connections here–cages and fences that restrict protestors in the streets, politicians like out child king Trump who encourage aggressive response to dissent, citizens arrested on their own land for protesting trespassing private corporations which, enabled by corrupt eminent domain proceedings, fragment private property for corporate gain, Native Americans put at risk then pounded into submission, in the 21st century, because the white town up the road said no, black kids gunned down in the street for running away.

I’m not an insurrectionist, but at least in this context I appreciate the concerns and grievances of the Teabaggers and even Douchebag Extremists like the deeply misguided tax-cheating Bundy family and their Sagebrush Rebellion predecessors. They’re wrong on the why, but they’ve got a sense of the what.

I long for the unlikely day that simple people, whether they’re just customers trying to get what they pay for, or black kids just trying to get by, or Cowboys just wanting to be Cowboys, or Coal Miners looking for jobs, and everybody else sees that we’ve got more in common with each other than the corporations that see us as little more than dolphins caught in their driftnets, the super-wealthy who profit from them, the managers who sell their souls in service to those profits, or the politicians who enable and sustain them.

 

 

I Know You’re Mad at United but… (Thoughts from a Pilot Wife About Flight 3411)

If there’s one thing I have learned over the years, it’s that there are always two sides to every story.

On April 9th, a very unfortunate incident played out on United Flight 3411, the video of which has since gone viral causing a mass social media uprising with an ‘off-with-their-heads’ mentality. I mean, across the board. Fire ’em all and let the gods sort it out later.

Look, I get it. When I first saw the video I was appalled too. To say that it was inflammatory would be putting it mildly. But it was also a situation that was escalated far beyond the boundaries of necessity.

If a federal law enforcement officer asks me to exit a plane, no matter how royally pissed off I am, I’m going to do it and then seek other means of legal reimbursement. True story.

Knowing what I know about airport security, I’m certainly not going to run back into a secured, federally restricted area at an airport flailing my arms and screaming like a banshee…because, you know, that just happens to be breaking a major federal Homeland Security law.

But that’s just me. Obviously.

The moment I made that particular ill-advised choice, I would become an immediate and imminent threat to the aircraft’s security. That’s kind of a big deal. I mean, come on, I once actually had to remove my infant son’s socks because they mimicked little baby sneakers. These guys mean business.

I didn’t like it. I thought it was just plain stupid, honestly. But instead of pitching a massive fit, refusing to comply, and bolting through the TSA checkpoint like an out-of-control toddler, I did the big girl thing–sucked it up, removed the offensive socks, and went on with my happy life, sans being tackled and dragged through the airport in handcuffs by a bunch of big men with guns.

Because if you choose to take advantage of the services the airport provides, you play by their rules.

I know you’re all out there screaming that the ‘rules’ are unfair, but I am a pilot wife. I remember 9/11. Do you? I want my husband, the father of my children, to come home. I want you to get homeThat law exists to protect my husband. And your wife. And your grandmother. And your child. And you. I, for one, am glad for the law.

I’m not here to dispute the facts of 3411 with you. I am not interested in getting into an argument of opinion with anyone. We’re all entitled to our own. I’m not arguing that what happened wasn’t completely terrible–it was, on multiple levels. But I am suggesting that the general public take another look at the situation, ask a few more questions, gather a few more facts, and then create a less hostile and more intellectually wrought opinion about what happened.

Because the media is giving you just enough information to keep you enraged–enough to keep their ratings up.

Things to consider:

1) “You can’t just kick a paying customer off the plane!” Psssst! It’s in the fine print. They can, indeed, do just that. And it’s not an airline specific rule, it’s a commercial aviation rule. Every ticket you purchase comes with a plethora of fine print–you know, the stuff we just click ‘next’ on without actually reading what we are agreeing to. Yeah, that. Well, it’s in there, and you checked the ‘I agree’ box when you purchased your ticket. You can read about it and oh-so-much-more here. Kind of makes you want to read all those tiny words on your next phone update before you click ‘I agree’, huh? You should. United did not break any law, and he agreed to the policy and possibility of involuntary bump when he bought his ticket. And so do you.

2) “Kicking a paying customer off an airplane!? I’m taking my business to Southwest!” Ummmm, okay. But just be sure you understand that every major airline, Southwest included, has a similar policy for involuntary bumping in a ‘must ride’ scenario. Don’t believe me? It’s called the contract of carriage. If you’re really bored, you can read Southwest’s here. Or Delta’s here. Believe me, it’s in there.  This could have been any airline. In fact, it happens all the time. Most people just don’t wrestle the feds in the aisle.

3: “So what’s this ‘must ride’ nonsense anyway? They shouldn’t bump a paying customer for a free employee ride!” I’m afraid you’re going to have to take this up with the federal government, not United. And it’s actually pretty important to you as an airline traveler anyway. They were not ‘freeloading home’. That’s called non-rev and they have to wait in line behind your checkbook and often don’t make it home to their families if flights are booked (believe me, I know). No, this was a must fly, a positive space situation. In layman terms, it means that a crew must be flown to an airport to man a flight in order to avoid cancellation of said flight due to crew unavailability. This is a federal DOT regulation, not an airline one. The airlines are required to do so to avoid disruption of air traffic. In other words, if there are no willing volunteers and they need seats to get a crew somewhere to avoid disruption of aviation flow, they can, will, must by federal regulation bump people for the better good of the 1000’s. Why? Because one cancelled flight has a serious domino affect in the delicate, complicated world of connections and aviation law.

4: “It’s the airline’s fault for not planning better!” You obviously have no clue about the complexities of aviation travel and should do some research. There are about a million and one things that can cause a crew shortage including but not limited to weather, maintenance, weather, connecting fight delays, weather, FAA timeout regs, and did I mention weather? I wish I could control Mother Nature because I would be one filthy rich person. But I can’t. And neither can United. So they inconvenience one, or four, to keep hundreds on track. Do the math. And of course, if we were on the other end of this thing, we’d be tirading and blowing up the internet because United didn’t bump a passenger to make sure our flight didn’t get cancelled and left hundreds stranded. Damned if you do; damned if you don’t. We’re a fickle crowd, we social media folks.

5: They shouldn’t have picked the minority Chinese doctor! It’s racist.” That’s just silly. Though federal regulation demands they involuntarily bump to prevent interruption of flights when necessary, each airline does have the leniency to determine how they choose the bumped passengers. They did not play spin the bottle or walk down the aisle looking for the Asian guy. Use your heads, people! There is a computerized algorithm that takes into account price of ticket, how long ago it was purchased, whether or not they can get the passenger to their destination in a timely manner, etc. It wasn’t an ‘Asian thing.’ Stop, people. Just stop.

6: “United should go under for assaulting that passenger! Fire the entire crew!” Read the facts. United neeeever touched the passenger. In fact, by all witness accounts, the United flight crew remained calm and pleasant throughout the entire event, never laying hands on the passenger. They followed protocol as required by law. Once law enforcement became involved (also as required by federal protocol), United stepped out of the decision-making process. They had nothing to do with the rest. The passenger was forcibly removed by federal aviation security (the disturbing clip that everyone is talking about) after running back into the secured area after being escorted out once. Once he did that, like it or not, they (law enforcement) were under full discretion of the law to apply necessary force to remove the threat. I’m not saying it’s pretty, but the only one who actually broke a law was the passenger. There’s a reason for these laws–it’s called 9/11. We can’t have it both ways. But by all means, let’s berate and punish an entire flight crew–in fact thousands of pilots, FA’s, gate attendents, ground crew, etc.–because it makes us all feel a little better.

7: “You piece of **it!” I get that the passengers were upset, angry, maybe even confused. I get that you are too. After all, media is tossing you out chunks of bloody meat like you’re a pack of starving wolves. But I’m seriously disgusted that the poor must ride crew that had to take those seats after the unfortunate mess that unraveled were verbally abused and threatened. Can you imagine the very uncomfortable position they were in? Then they were demeaned, belittled, threatened. Along with many others all over the internet and airports today. They were and are men and women doing their jobs to feed their families. Just. Like. You.  They didn’t have a choice. They didn’t ask for this. They didn’t assault anyone. They are not a corporation; they are individuals who need a job. They are my friends and maybe even my husband. There’s a very fine line between what you despise and becoming what you despise. Many of the comments and actions I have seen perpetrated against United employees cross it. Don’t become what you hate.

Like I said, I know you’re mad at United, but there’s much more to the story than hits the media fan.

I truly hope that this gives you something to chew on and gives you a smidgen more insight into the complexities of aviation. I’m not making excuses. I think there were bad decisions made on both sides. However, I am saying there are always two sides to every story. Make sure you consider them both.

Tailwinds.

***A correction to the previous article. Mr. Dao was indeed Vietnamese and not Chinese.  That quote was verbatim from a comment off the internet. I apology profusely for the confusion.

Angelia (A Pilot Wife)

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Minneapolis Falcon Heights: Time For The NRA to Walk The Walk

160707071532-graphic-video-minnesota-police-shooting-philando-castile-ryan-young-pkg-nd-00010909-large-169Another day, and another American gunned down for having the audacity to be black. Against this latest atrocity, and apart from so much that needs to be said about sympathy for Philando Castile’s friends and loved ones, as well as the angry recriminations that should rightfully be directed at the Falcon Heights Police officer who gunned down a man who seems, from the streaming video that has swept the internet, to have been a perfectly law-abiding, upstanding citizen, this occurs to me: It is time for the NRA to spend a little less energy on defending backdoor tactics that help people to sidestep background checks, and put their effort behind seeking some justice for a law-abiding licensed gun owner who was executed for attempting to provide his registration and identification!

I very much doubt that NRA honcho Wayne LaPierre will have much to say on the subject, because I can’t imagine that would resonate with the gun marketing organization’s core demographic, which is rural white people, or its over-riding mission, which to not to protect anyone’s rights so much as it is to channel fear and hostility into gun and ammo sales. The NRA wants white folks to be afraid of black folks, because fear and suspicion stoke  sales. Stepping up for a gun owner who is black, who was murdered for politely following a white police officer’s shouted instructions, is going to muddy the water for a lot of the singular-minded firearm fetishists who feed the NRA’s coffers.

Still, I’m open to pleasant surprise. Heck, I’m quietly begging to be proven wrong. So here’s my challenge again…

Dear Wayne LaPierre and All NRA Members: prove that you aren’t all hypocrites. Demand that the full power of your organization be turned toward seeking justice for Philando Castile. Make me look like an idiot for doubting your conviction and predicting that you’ll all just sit on your hands and say, “Well, he must have been asking for it.”

#philandocastille

 

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Who Didn’t See This Coming?

Yet another law enforcement officer has been killed, this time near Chicago, and while the initial, uncertain reports available thus far imply that Lt. Charles Joseph Gliniewicz was not targeted, but rather that he was doing his job, happening into a suspicious situation in which he intervened, the killing falls into a pattern.

The account I’ve heard was that he pursued three individuals on foot and was not heard from again. He was found dead, without his handgun and “equipment,” a short time later.  It appears he had been killed “execution style,” implying that his quarry–three men on foot–somehow turned the tables on him and killed him in cold blood. Lt. Gliniewicz, at age 52, was a 30-year veteran and father of four who was slated to retire in a few weeks.

The news reports portray Gliniewicz as a fantastic, heroic guy and a superior officer, but of course they do–how much he was loved and respected is irrelevant to the greater truth here: another cop has been murdered, something like the 7th in the past month, and it has to stop.

And here’s where I get unpopular.  Despite the increased news coverage, police murders have held relatively steady this year, declining slightly from last year, though the perception is quite different.  This is not something in which we should take comfort.  The numbers are still too high.  One officer killed in the line of duty is too many.  This isn’t television–most cops go through entire careers without discharging their weapons in the line of duty, and that is how it should be.  Behind those statistics, unfortunately, is a promise of more violence to come.  The news coverage of these horrible deaths translate to desensitization to violence–potential killers will be inspired.

And we know what happens next: law enforcement, justifiably angry and fearful, will double down.  Mainstream contemporary police theory is to employ hyper-dominant, preemptively aggressive behavior to “control” encounters rather than mediation.  When you see a cop, on youtube or on the street, yelling and cursing at someone for what seems like a relatively minor reason, that officer is not necessarily an asshole–although he or she has been taught to act that way.

Police orthodoxy has to change. When I was a child, my mother taught me that if I ever was in trouble, and she wasn’t available, that I could go to a cop.  Three decades later, an integral part of my teaching my daughters to drive was how to avoid accidentally escalating the always potentially dangerous traffic stop.—Put the car in park and turn off the ignition. Lock the doors and put the window down 1/3.  Retrieve your papers while the officer is still in his car calling in your info, but be sure to have your hands where he can see them as he approaches, palms up and open. Turn the dome light on if it is dark.  Once the officer is at your door, make no sudden moves–NEVER reach for anything without asking permission first–and even after getting permission, move slowly–a cell phone can look like a gun, and you can be justifiably killed for holding it….”

How have we created a paradigm in which we much fear our protectors?  More importantly, are we at a precipice from which we can pull back, or have we gone over the edge?  I like to think the latter, and I believe that we can do it with minimal effort and a lot of dialogue.

It has to come from the cops.  I’ve written this entire piece without mentioning the giant elephant in the room–police violence.  The numbers are shocking, and the individual stories–going far beyond the sensationalized events in Ferguson, Missouri and New York City or Cleveland, Ohio and Baltimore  are often terrifying.  The issue has often been clouded as a racial problem, and while race is often a factor–the police involved are primarily white, the victims primarily brown*–this is overwhelmingly about power more than race.  The two dovetail, of course, but the not exclusively.

Community policing, retraining officers to focus on deescalating rather than dominating confrontations, securing a larger percentage of more intelligent officers–by providing better pay and benefits–and, most of all, making the “thin blue line” a lot more transparent–would be a great start.  If you know police officers, you know that they know who the jerks in their departments are, and they aren’t surprised when those guys do something stupid.  Or something awful.  This has to stop.  Good officers need to stop tolerating their misbehaving peers–the very few outliers, among the majority of good, hardworking, honorable public servants–even if that means turning their backs on them.  I understand this will be a hard thing to do, but the bad cop who beats a suspect, or shoots an unarmed suspect–is a traitor to his community as well as to his brothers and sisters in blue.

But what about the bad guys? There are always going to be bad guys–that’s why we need cops. Unfortunately, it is difficult to get criminals to behave respectably, or to do anything, really. They are also, by definition, traitors to their community.  The police, on the other hand, represent our institutions, and must be held to a higher standard.  They will not only be making a better community, and doing a better job, but they will be preventing the kind of adverse media attention that puts targets on their own backs, and on the backs of their peers.

If things continue the way they’re going, more and more police will be singled out as potential targets, which will lead to increased vigilance and fear-grounded aggression that leads to more conflict, more violence, and more resentment. The cycle is self-perpetuating. We must demand more from our protectors, in order to put them at less risk.

Interesting Related links:

776 People Killed By Police So Far in 2015, 161 Of Them Unarmed

Police departments are already seeing a decline in recruitment.

“Oh, God, I thought they were going to shoot me next”

“Why did you shoot me? I was reading a book”

*Isn’t this the stupidest thing?  When I say it like this, I can’t help but shake my head–defining by skin color! 

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Baltimore: Really, Who Didn’t See This Coming?

cop 1I feel bad for Baltimore, just as I felt bad for Ferguson–because of the innocents who get caught up in the mayhem, because of setbacks the violence and thievery of a few selfish punks who inevitably appear to take advantage of the frustration, grief, and despair which always lay behind these incidents. I feel bad for the victims, not just from today but from the harsh, inevitable retribution that will storm down upon citizens of the affected communities long after our short collective attention spans have moved on to the next big thing.

I’ve heard it asked over and over again, “how can those people do this?” Those people.

I’ve heard words like “thugs’ and “savages”–the same words we use to describe our foreign enemies, words spoken in true ignorance, but with all due respect to the innocent, we reap what we sow.  But then, who didn’t see this coming? Young people, especially young black men, have been dying at the hands of police officers in almost plague-like numbers.  Worse still, these incidents have not abated one bit despite growing community concern and unprecedented media attention–a indicator of just  t how arrogant the offenders are, and just how little they worry about punishment.

dangerousConsider the young man in San Bernardino County, California who ran from Sheriff’s deputies looking to arrest him on identity theft charges. He ran for it, in a T.J, Hooker-worthy chase  that ultimately included automobiles, motorcycles, helicopters, running through the desert and stolen horses. Ignore for a moment the wisdom of investing so much time, energy, resources, effort and, most of all, ego into chasing a suspect of a non-violent crime, and move to the finish where, having been tasered off a stolen horse, the really, really pissed off cops–eleven of them–kicked the crap out of this guy, who had surrendered, face down in the dirt, hands behind his back.  It was so crowded around his body that the cops had to take turns getting their kicks in.  Did I mention that all this happened with a new helicopter hovering overhead?  That’s what I mean by arrogance–and zero fear of justice. And this was a white guy!  Imagine if it had been a young black kid?  I have this vision of them burying the body right there in amidst the brush, taking selfies and waving to the copter while they took turns digging his shallow grave.

And yet, most people are good people, although we’ve allowed things to get this far. All of us.  Most leaders are conscientious leaders, but they have settled for plugging the holes in our breached social dam with mud and tree stumps. despite the rain. Heck, most cops are good cops–I have friends and relatives are among them–but too many have made the easy choice and put brotherhood over honest service. I know many officers lose sleep over that choice, but it is silence that takes us this place where a man is taken into custody because of a suspicion–there was no observed or alleged crime, no outstanding warrant–and ended up dead. He was pursued and apprehended because he ran. That is all.  If he ran because he was afraid it seems that he was right to feel that way–let’s be forthright here: as inflammatory as it sounds, it is a short step to equate what law enforcement has been doing to black folks to the tacitly approved lynchings in the southern USA only a generation ago

Now, I’ve already seen conservatives arguing that this guy was a recidivist not worthy of the destruction being wrought in his name, but here’s the thing: it’s not so much about Pepper Gray: it’s about the last guy, and the guy before that, and the guy before that. Black folks have a particular right to be both terrified and outraged, pushed into a metaphorical corner by a seemingly relentless pattern of authoritarian violence, the only possible end to which had to be rebellion; but this extends beyond race.

help-policePolicing has become synonymous with dominant aggression.  Officers are trained to assume a posture of outrageous aggression as a preemption to resistance or, in layman’s terms, that cop who gets in your face and shouts and curses at you is doing it purposefully, to establish his dominance and control your interaction.  Trained to approach all interactions from an aggressive posture, it is little wonder so many encounters quickly go bad. It is only a few steps up the escalation ladder from there.

The problem is that the good cops, as I said earlier, put brotherhood ahead of justice.  I understand this. They must feel it is an obligation, literally putting their lives in each others hands sometimes, to circle the wagons when one of them screws up.  By the same logic, our prosecutors who rely on and work with theses officers on an daily basis feel that obligation.  And the juries, faced with an allegedly abusive cop, the evidence against whom has been white-washed by a protective establishment, is forced to decide between an allegedly bad cop and the allegedly deserving “criminal,” with whom are they going to identify? I’d make examples here, but the victims are too many to count.  Pick the homeless guy on the BART platform in San Francisco a few years back, or the little kid with a toy gun in Cleveland, or the dude selling loose smokes in New York.  Or the kid with Downs syndrome who was killed barehanded because he had a tantrum about leaving a movie theater.  Or a hundred others–there are hundreds of cases all a click away, if one chooses to look, of cops who lose it and never, ever face justice.

Unfortunately, when one officer is shielded from justice, then another, and another, and another–while their victims are killed in what seems like an almost methodical attempt at putting the disenfranchised in their places, tension tends to build.  A person who watched the TV news sees and endless parade of mostly black suspects–not convicts, but suspects–perp-walked across the TV screen every night, with not a word mentioned when many of these suspects are later released.  Similarly, law enforcement blithely posts booking photos of suspects on their web sites, but never offers explanations when many of those people are released.

But when a police officer kills a citizen, we face the great blue wall of silence, with no orange jumpsuits or perp-walks, no parading before the public.  Some variation of “Police officials declined to reveal the names of the officers involved, or comment beyond saying that there would be an internal investigation.  The officers have been put on administrative leave with pay.”

7b3298070c7aec58d144ae6027ddc52fThat’s not right, but we tolerate it.  Until we resist, and demand sweeping reform of law enforcement, we are all complicit in both the rioting and the murders that preceded them.  Communities must rise up and demand accountability, and honest police officers must abandon the “thin blue line” mentality and regard transgressors as soldiers regard traitors whose behavior endangers both their mission and their lives.  If we don’t, the prospect of expanded, open rebellion and the violence that accompanies both it and the inevitable government response is inevitable

 

 

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Wednesday Words of Wisdom: Malcolm X

malcolmxI believe in the brotherhood of man, all men, but I don’t believe in brotherhood with anybody who doesn’t want brotherhood with me. I believe in treating people right, but I’m not going to waste my time trying to treat somebody right who doesn’t know how to return the treatment.
—Malcolm X

I’m still working on my words about Baltimore, but this quote comes to mind as  informative and deeply applicable.  A lot of poor folks haven’t been treated right for a long time, and as Malcolm’s contemporary once said, “a hard rain’s a gonna fall” if things don’t change soon.

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Commentary

Stupid Stuff Micro-Post: Stupid Cops

Stupid Headlines that show up in my news aggregator, and other Stupid Stuff that lands in front of me–a new tradition I talked about here.  Who knows?  No one knows–it’s a big, damn mystery.  But the world is brimming with Stupid, and I’m setting out to document it and share it with you on days that I can’t think of anything worthwhile or positive to write about.

Keystone_bw_001Sometimes it’s not the headlines that are stupid, it’s the subjects of the story.

“Video Shows California Deputies Beating Man Fleeing On Horse”
Eleven on one beat down.  With the Channel Four helicopter circling overhead.  I guess you didn’t notice that the whole Cop Violence thing has been in the news once

One cop thinks he's auditioning for a job as placekicker for the Oakland Raiders.
One cop thinks he’s auditioning for a job as placekicker for the Oakland Raiders.

or twice in the past few years?  And people are watching.  Were you really so dead set on beating this dipstick (and I’ll grant you a lot of these guys must be begging for it, but the truth is that I meet a dozen guys a day I’d just like to beat into a puddle, but I don’t–most of us don’t–because we know we live in a society of rules and, more pertinently, we know if we get caught there will be hell to pay–but I guess that’s the rub, right, there isn’t much hell to pay when you’ve got that shiny tin license to kill.)  Stupid.  Stupid. Stupid–but you sure showed that guy who’s boss, didn’t you?

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Commentary

What Have We Wrought?

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Commentary Funny and/or Strange

Thanksgiving Countdown: Day Seven, All Axes Pass

We’ve done the guns. It’s time to get visceral.
vintagethanksgiving1
e6be4b6f4d633c09f9a0ed19e80dcf98

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Commentary

Ferguson: When The Pot Inevitably Boils Over, We’re All Going to Burn

Excessive-force

http://aattp.org/op-ed-seven-simple-steps-to-end-police-brutality-and-restore-justice-to-america/

Not being privy to the facts, I can’t begin to comment on the specific events in Ferguson, beyond that it fails the “stink test” though not as badly as the do many other police-related acts of violence.  The sad truth is that Ferguson, as painful as it has been to so many, is just part of a chain of incidents, and the unrest occurring there represents a continuity of events, and frustrations, that has been going on almost forever.  It is only going to get worse, because each time an officer of the law is acquitted other officers become less fearful resting and potentially constructive article which I agree with whole-heartedly. I would, however, add a few items that, I think, would help to alleviate the sense of powerlessness, not to mention the scent of obfuscation and and concealment that hangs over so many incidents of police violence.

1.) In the face of an incident, police officers should be treated as would any citizen.  If I kill a man in the street, I am almost certain to be arrested, processed, and confined pending a hearing.  It is likely I will be perp-walked before cameras, my name and background released to the press.  When a police officer kills a man in the street (or commits any criminal act either in public or private) the police department involved generally makes efforts to shroud the officer’s identity, and months–sometimes years–can go by before the investigation, and any charges, are addressed and during that time the officer may continue to serve, or at worst incur a reduction in duties.  It is little wonder that citizens suspect collusion between police perpetrators, district attorneys.  A potential crime is a potential crime.  Giving police privacy that civilians don’t enjoy is a luxury we, as a nation, can no longer afford.

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Commentary Funny and/or Strange Uncategorized video

The Homecoming Queen’s Got A Gun

The coming weekend will mark Homecoming celebrations in our community–a football game, the crowning of a king and queen, corsages and whatever those guy-corsage things that get pinned to lapels are called, kids dressing up and dancing and memories of –good god, it’s 30 years. Ugh. I wore a wool sweater under a brown wool herringbone jacket because I thought it would be better than a tie, and I nearly died from overheating.

m_julie_brown_homecoming_queenThose memories–really the only details I can recall from that night–bring to mind an old Julie Brown comedy song called “The Homecoming Queen’s Got A Gun”–a tale of a possibly PMS-ridden beauty turned sniper that was hilarious in 1984, when the idea of a kid taking a gun to school and rampaging was so absurd it was funny–not the least because it was a parody of the teen-angst songs our parents listened to.

It ain’t so funny now, and that’s a real shame.  I know how each generation thinks that things started going all to hell the moment they “age out” of a stage in life, but us Gen X’ers are truly living the dream–we’re the ones.  Who would have thought, when Coupland wrote his book, that it was the pinnacle?

You know you’re old when you can look at such a huge cultural change and think of one’s youth as “simpler times” when all we had to worry about was Reaganomics and the hovering threat of impending worldwide thermonuclear war. Sigh.

 

It was Homecoming Night at my high school
Everyone was there, it was totally cool
I was real excited, I almost wet my jeans
‘Cause my best friend Debbie was Homecoming Queen
She looked so pretty in pink chiffon. (Chiffon)
Riding the float with her tiara on. (Tiara on)
Holding this humongous bouquet in her hand. (Bouquet)
She looked straight out of Disneyland!
You know that Cinderella ride
I mean definitely an E-ticket. (E-ticket)
The crowd was cheering, everyone was stoked
I mean it was like the whole school was totally coked or something.
The band was playing ‘Evergreen’
Then all of a sudden, somebody screamed:
Look out! The Homecoming Queen’s got a GUN!!!

Everybody run, the Homecoming Queen’s got a gun!
Everybody run, the Homecoming Queen has got a gun!
Debbie’s smiling, and waving her gun
Picking off cheerleaders one by one
Oh! Buffy’s pom poms just blew to bits
Oh no, Misty’s head just did the splits!
My best friend is on a shooting spree
Stop it, Debbie, you’re embarrassing me!
How could you do what you just did
Are you having a really bad period?

Everybody run, the Homecoming Queen’s got a gun!
Everybody run, the Homecoming Queen has got a gun!
Stop it, Debbie, you’re making a mess
Powder burns all over your dress
An hour later, ,the cops had arrived
By then the entire glee club had died – no big loss
You wouldn’t believe what they brought to stop
Tear gas, machine guns… even a chopper!
Throw down your gun and tiara and come out of that float!
Debbie didn’t listen to what the cop said,
She aimed and fired, and now the math teacher’s dead!
Oh, it’s really sad, but kinda of a relief,
I mean we had this big test coming up next week…

Everybody run, the Homecoming Queen’s got a gun!
Everybody run, the Homecoming Queen has got a gun!
Debbie’s really having a blast!
She’s wasted half of the class!
The cops fired a warning shot and she dove off that float.
I tried to scream Duck! but it stuck in my throat.
She hit the ground and did a flip; it was real acrobatic.
But I was crying so hard, I couldn’t work my Instamatic.
I ran down to Debbie, I had to find out.
What made her do it, why’d she freak out?
I saw the bullet had got her right in the ear.
I knew then… the end was near.

So I ran down and said in her good ear.
Debbie, why’d you do it?
She raised her head and smiled and said.
I did it for Johnny.
Johnny, well like whose Johnny? Answer me Debbie whose Johnny.
Does anybody here named Johnny?
Are you Johnny? There was one guy named Johnny.
But he was a total geek. He always had food in his braces.
Answer me Debbie whose Johnny.
Oh God this is like that movie Citizen King
You know where you later find out Rosemary was a slut
But we’ll never know who Johnny is because like she’s dead

Everybody run, the Homecoming Queen’s got a gun!
Everybody run, the Homecoming Queen has got a
Everybody run
Everybody run the Homecoming Queen’s got a”